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MLA Citation Guide: 8th Edition

This guide will help you understand how to use the MLA citation format for both in-text citations and works cited lists. It includes some more commonly used source formats. For complete information, please consult the MLA Handbook for Writers of Research

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Web Sites and Parts of Web Sites

CONTENTS OF THIS BOX

Entire Web Sites

Parts of Web Sites

Citing an Entire Web Site

Provide the author or name of whoever is responsible for the web site. Include any sponsor or publisher of the web site (a university, corporation, foundation, etc.), and the date (or date range) the site was created, followed by the URL (withouth the http or https( (or permalink). Some of this information may not be available. Don't worry about this: you can't include what isn't there. Because web sites are subject to change, it is a good idea to include the access date.

Basic Format

Author of the web site (last name, first name). Title of the site (italicized). Publisher, Date, URL. Access Date.

What do citations look like?

Note that the following web site does not list a date of publication.

Folsom, Ed and Kenneth M. Price, editors. The Walt Whitman Archive. Center for Digital Research in the

Humanities, whitmanarchive.org/. Accessed 26 Feb. 2017.

The following web site does not have a known author. In that case, begin your citation with the title of the web site.

NCTE: National Council or Teachers of English . NCTE, 2016, www.ncte.org/. Accessed 27 Feb. 2017.

Citing Part of a Web Site

List the author, if known, followed by the title of the article, followed by the information shown above for the entire web site.

Basic Format

Author of the article (last name, first name). Title of the web site (italicized). Publisher, Date, URL.

Access Date.

What does a citation look like?

Doheny, Kathleen. "A Stressed Life May Mean a Wider Waistline: Study Finds Chronic Anxiety Might

Raise Risk of Obesity." WebMd. 23 Feb. 2017, www.webmd.com/balance/stress-management/

news/20170223/ a-stressed-life-may-mean-a-wider-waistline#1. Accessed 27 Feb. 2017.



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